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Where To Buy Buffalo Grass Seed In Colorado


Success and satisfaction with buffalograss is critically dependent on the use of proper establishment and management practices. While it can be considered a low-maintenance grass once it is established, the production of a buffalograss lawn from seed can be a labor intensive and somewhat frustrating process. The use of sod improves results for the average home gardener, but it will be more expensive than if seed or plugs are used for establishment. It is essential to understand that, although buffalograss is a highly drought-resistant native plant, supplemental water MUST be used liberally in order to establish a lawn. The amount of water required to establish a buffalograss lawn from seed, sod, or plugs will be equal to (and occasionally greater than) that amount required to establish a bluegrass or tall fescue lawn.




where to buy buffalo grass seed in colorado



The use of pre-rooted plugs (sold via the internet, by some sod farms, and at a few nurseries and garden centers, in trays similar to those in which annual flowers are sold) can provide complete cover six to 12 weeks after planting (depending on plug spacing and weather conditions). As with seeding, proper soil preparation (see above) is essential for success when using plugs. Plant plugs on 12 to 18 inch centers following the last spring frost and at least 6 weeks prior to the first expected fall frost. Apply a starter-type fertilizer according to label instructions at planting, and again about 6-7 weeks after planting. Irrigate to maintain a moist surface for seven-10 days (three-five short irrigation cycles daily, every two-four hours beginning at 8:00 or 9:00 a.m.), and to maintain active grass growth thereafter. The pre-emergent herbicide pendimethalin (sold as Pre-M or Scotts Halts/Crabgrass Preventer) can be used to prevent weed invasion and is safe to use at the time of planting plugs. Buffalograss plugs will often turn brown after planting, even with adequate irrigation. This is quite normal; if they have been receiving consistent moisture, they have not died. The grass will come out of dormancy after the plugs have formed a healthy root system. It is important that the plugs and soil be kept moist after planting, even though the plugs may turn brown and appear to be dead or dormant.


Color and growth of an established buffalograss lawn will improve with fertilization, but little improvement occurs when more than two pounds of total N per 1000 square feet per growing season is applied. A suggested application schedule is one pound of N per 1000 square feet in late May to mid June, and again in late July. Excessive fertilization, especially in combination with too much water, can result in rapid weed invasion in the buffalograss lawn. Buffalograss is sometimes prone to iron chlorosis (yellowing) on high pH soils; supplemental iron applications will help to prevent or remedy this problem.


Once established, buffalograss can survive without irrigation. However, non-irrigated buffalograss becomes dormant during most summers, and is prone to weed invasion while dormant. Buffalograss lawns require a minimum of one-two inches of rainfall or irrigation every two-four weeks during the summer to maintain active growth and to look acceptably green. Deeper, infrequent irrigation (for example, one inch every two-four weeks, depending on rainfall) produces a good-quality buffalograss lawn and discourages weed invasion. Irrigation can begin in mid- to late-May if the spring is dry; irrigation earlier in the season does not speed spring green-up and encourages weed growth.


Mealybugs (Tridiscus sporoboli and Trionymus sp.) and a short-winged species of chinch bug (Blissus sp.) have been found in Nebraska buffalograss lawns, but have not yet caused problems in Colorado. Leafhoppers and grasshoppers are common nuisance pests, but do not generally damage healthy buffalograss lawns.


Bowie Buffalograss: Premium, Turf-Type Buffalograss seed from Native Turf Group. The cutting edge in turfgrass. A long-term solution for Low maintenance areas. From the past for the future. Low maintenance water-conserving, turf-type buffalograss...


Sharp's Improved II - Premium Turf-Type Buffalograss one of the first turf type buffalograss varieties with great turf density and leaf color. Widely adapted. Produces quality turf at an attractive price.Uses for BuffalograssHome...


OUT OF STOCK FOR THE SEASON! Please check out our other available buffalograss options. Buffalograss is a soft textured, fine leafed sod forming warm season grass which has endured for thousands of years in the harsh climate of the...


The Native Lawn Mix is a mix of warm-season buffalograss and blue grama, blended for an extremely drought-tolerant lawn that requires little water once established. Both grasses are native to the Colorado high plains and are adapted to our arid climate. Summer green up can be expected once soil temperatures reach 65 degrees, typically mid-May to early June. Do not use chemical methods of weed control during first growing season.


This directory was created to aid in locating commercially available sources of buffalograss seed, plugs and sod in and around the central and southern Great Plains region. Although the information presented in this directory was current at publication time, cultivar availability is subject to change. Retail nursery operations not regularly stocking buffalograss products were not included in this directory. In addition to locating sources in this directory, consumers are encouraged to contact their local retail center to determine product availability.


Buffalograss sod, plug or seed producers or other business entities specializing in the production or sale of buffalograss who are not listed in this directory and who wish to be included in the next update should direct their request to: Dennis Martin, Oklahoma State University, 358 Agricultural Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078, phone:405.744.5419 or dennis.martin@okstate.edu.


Step 1: In order to locate sources that carry buffalograss, one must first determine cultivar(s) or blend(s) name(s) to search for sources. Choose the cultivar or blend names (listed in alphabetical order) in the left hand column of Table 1. The cultivar type, whether originating from seed or from a vegetative source, is listed in the second column of Table 1. Vegetative cultivars are only available as sod or plugs. Some seeded cultivars may be available as sod, but rarely.


Buffalograss (warm season grass) is a native grass that can be planted in an area that receives little or no water or care. Buffalo grass is a native variety that does well in this sort of situation. A warm-season grass, it becomes green in mid-to-late May, and becomes dormant again around late September when night temperatures again begin to freeze. Once established, it requires little supplemental water or fertilizer, is low-growing and therefore needs little mowing. It also stands up well to wear. is a sod forming, warm season, native grass that is extremely drought resistant. It is low growing and attractive in appearance with few disease and insect problems. Sound too good to be true? It is. We may be a little too high and have too short of a growing season for buffalograss to thrive. But if you have a warm, south facing location with heavy soil, it is well worth trying. It has the ability to go dormant under drought stress and then to quickly green up and resume growth once moisture becomes available. Native grass seed is expensive; buy only certified and treated seed.


Imagine a green, lush lawn that can slake its thirst on the measly 14 inches of average annual rainfall Colorado Springs receives from Mother Nature. And that same turf can be mowed whenever, and fertilized and sprayed almost never.Such is life with buffalograss, a sod-forming, Colorado-native plant that's becoming more popular with homeowners as a lawn option because of its low water and mowing requirements. But before you join the stampede to buffalograss as a turf alternative to bluegrass or tall fescue, there are a few things to consider. Success and satisfaction with buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides) is dependent on the use of proper establishment and management practices, according to Tony Koski, turf


Such is life with buffalograss, a sod-forming, Colorado-native plant that's becoming more popular with homeowners as a lawn option because of its low water and mowing requirements. But before you join the stampede to buffalograss as a turf alternative to bluegrass or tall fescue, there are a few things to consider.


Success and satisfaction with buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides) is dependent on the use of proper establishment and management practices, according to Tony Koski, turf specialist for Colorado State University Extension.


While it can be considered a low-maintenance grass once established, starting a buffalograss lawn from seed can be labor-intensive and somewhat frustrating. The use of sod improves results for the average home gardener, but it will be more expensive than seed or plugs.


Koski stresses that while buffalograss is highly drought-resistant, supplemental water must be used liberally in order to establish a lawn. In fact, the amount of water required to establish a buffalograss lawn from seed, sod or plugs will be equal to the amount required to establish a bluegrass or tall fescue lawn.


Buffalo grass is a warm-season grass. While a bluegrass lawn will start to green in March, you will have to wait until May to see green in buffalograss. The best time to install buffalograss in El Paso County is June 1 through Aug. 15.


Commercially available cultivars that have proven to be quite winter hardy along the Front Range are Legacy, Prestige and Turffalo. These varieties will produce a high-quality buffalograss lawn anywhere below 6,500 feet, Koski said.


While insect or disease problems are rare, weed invasion is the most common and frustrating problem in the buffalograss home lawn. Pre-emergent herbicides ("crabgrass preventers") are safe to use during spring on well-established, mature buffalograss lawns. But buffalograss can be injured - and discolored - easily by many of the off-the-shelf herbicides sold in garden centers for the control of dandelions and other broadleaf weeds in bluegrass and tall fescue lawns. 041b061a72


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